Proposed changes to the Constitution of the Libertarian Party of Washington State

Article VI: Officers

Section 2. (Amendment proposed by Data Logan)

Currently reads:

“Party Officers will be elected individually, on separate ballots, in the order set forth above, at
the annual Party Convention. No offices shall be combined. When three or more candidates run
for an office, the election shall be conducted using an instant runoff vote.”

Proposed amendment:

“Party Officers will be elected individually, on separate ballots, in the order set forth above, at
the annual Party Convention. No offices shall be combined. When three or more than two
candidates run for an office, and no majority winner exists, the election shall be conducted using
an instant runoff vote a Condorcet voting system such as ranked pairs, Beatpath or Schultz
method. If a tie occurs the candidate with the highest relative number of first-place votes will
be the winner. If a tie still exists between two or more options, then a random method shall be
used to resolve the tie such as the flip of a coin or roll of a dice

Impact to LPWA:


In the event that there are more than two candidates for a single office, a ranked
pair voting system will be used instead of an instant runoff voting system.

Instant Runoff system: Instead of voting only for a single candidate, in IRV, voters
can rank the candidates in order of preference. Ballots are initially counted for each
elector’s top choice. If a candidate secures more than half of these votes, that
candidate wins. Otherwise, the candidate in last place is eliminated and removed
from consideration. The top remaining choices on all the ballots are then counted
again. This process repeats until one candidate is the top remaining choice of a
majority of the voters. When the field is reduced to two, it has become an “instant
runoff” that allows a comparison of the top two candidates head-to-head.

Ranked Pair system: Ranked Pairs (RP) or Tideman (named after Nicolaus
Tideman) is a voting system that selects a single winner using votes that express
preferences. RP can also be used to create a sorted list of winners. RP passes the
Condorcet Criterion, and is by definition a Condorcet method. RP has many
variations such as the Maximize Affirmed Majorities (MAM) and Maximum
Majority Voting (MMV) voting methods.

Schulze Method: A voting system developed in 1997 by Markus Schulze that selects
a single winner using votes that express preferences. The method can also be used
to create a sorted list of winners. The Schulze method is also known as Schwartz
Sequential dropping (SSD), cloneproof Schwartz sequential dropping (CSSD),
the beatpath method, beatpath winner, path voting, and path winner.
The Schulze method is a Condorcet method, which means the following: if there is a
candidate who is preferred by a majority over every other candidate in pairwise
comparisons, then this candidate will be the winner when the Schulze method is
applied. The output of the Schulze method gives an ordering of candidates.